Walking Tours

300 Years of Stories Walking Tour

TOUR FULL

Date: Wednesday, May 25, 2022 6:00 PM

Led by Randy Watts. This short two-block walk examines the history of Carlisle from 1722 to 2022, progressing from a discussion starting with the early visits of traders, to the French and Indian War and the start of the American Revolution and the US Army. We’ll then discuss events in Carlisle’s town square, including the Federalist and McClintock Riots, and visit the Soldiers’ Monument that was dedicated in 1871. From there we’ll talk about the time Geronimo visited town, the passage of President Grant as he traveled to Newville to visit in-laws and finish up with a look at the trolley stop and train station at Pitt and High Streets.

This tour is for adults only.

Members – $10 / Non-Members $15

Ashland Cemetery Walking Tour

Date: Sunday, June 12, 2022 2:00 PM

Join Lisa Brousse for a walking tour of Ashland Cemetery. Ashland was one of the first “garden cemeteries” in the United States and those buried within provide a fascinating history of Carlisle. We will discuss the history of the cemetery and burial customs of the era. The tour will concentrate on the variety of grave markers found at Ashland and those buried within or beneath them. The tour involves a bit of walking and will take place rain or shine so please wear comfortable shoes and dress for the weather. Meet inside front gates of Ashland Cemetery.

Cost: $10/member; $15/nonmember; $5/under 12

Register Here

Carlisle’s Industrial End Walking Tour

Tour Full

Date: Sunday, June 18, 2022 10:00 AM

Led by Randy Watts. The East End of Carlisle was home to Carlisle’s first large industrial enterprises, the sole survivor of which is the Frog Switch Manufacturing Company. This walk, of about six blocks, will discuss the development of industries here from the 1860s to the present. We’ll visit the site of the Chain Works, the Carlisle Manufacturing Company,
Beetem Lumber, Carlisle Carpet, Letort Axle and Frog Switch Company, along with taking a look at the railroads and early streets in the area. This walk will meet at the corner of East Louther and Spring Garden Streets. A short portion of the walk will be on an unpaved roadway with an irregular surface. This portion of the tour is optional.

Please note that this tour is for adults only.

Cost: Members $10; Non-members $15

Two Mile House Art Tour

Date: Wednesday, June 29, 2022 2:00 PM

Enjoy an afternoon on the Terrace of Two Mile House with lemonade and cookies as Mary Caverly leads tours through the house detailing the artwork on the walls.

Cost: Members Free; Non-members $5

Non-Member Registration

Member Registration

19th Century Fire Houses Walking Tour

Date: Sunday, July 2, 2022 10:00 AM

Led by Randy Watts. This approximately one-mile walk will visit six surviving fire houses dating from the 1850s to the 1890s. Along the way we’ll discuss some of Carlisle’s larger fires and discuss several tragic deaths to both civilians and firemen. The tour concludes at the Museum of the Union Fire Company, and participants can tour that facility if desired. Tour is adults only.

Cost: Members $10; Non-members $15

Register Here

Oddfellows Building Tour

Date: September 3, 10 a.m. AND 1 p.m., meet at History on High – The Shop Led by David Smith. Please R.S.V.P. in advance as there is a 25 person maximum.

Cost: Members Free; Non-members $5

Member Registration

Non-Member Registration

Trolleys of Carlisle Walking Tour

Date: TBD

Led by Randy Watts. At one time Carlisle was the hub of three trolley lines radiating to Newville, Mount Holly Springs, Harrisburg and the West Shore. This six-block walking tour will give an overview of the tracks, share the history of when they were built, and their role in the history of Cumberland County.

Please note that this tour is for adults only.

Underground Railroad Walking Tour

Date: Saturday, September 24, 2022 10:00 AM
Matthew March, Education Curator, will lead this walking tour that will focus on the role of abolitionists and freedom seekers in Boiling Springs.   The historic village was the site of an Underground Railroad “station” operated by area resident, Daniel Kaufman. Meet in Boiling Springs at the parking lot by the Mill apartments off Bucher Hill RD between 107 Bucher Hill Rd and the mill.
Cost: $10/member; $15/nonmember; $5/school-age-children

Register Here

Camp Michaux Walking Tour

Date: Saturday, November 19, 2022 1 PM

David Smith will lead the popular Camp Michaux walking tour of the old Bunker Hill Farm; Pine Grove Furnace CCC Camp; Pine Grove Furnace POW Interrogation Camp; and finally the United Church of Christ & United Presbyterian Church Camp. Meet at the furnace in Pine Grove State Park.

Cost: $10/member; $15/nonmember; $5/school-age-children

Register Here

Bus  Tours

No Bus Tours are currently scheduled.

Bus Trip Regulations:
1. Early sign up for bus trips is important
2. No refunds will be made unless: the Historical Society cancels the trip
due to insufficient registration or the bus company cancels the trip.
3. Please be prompt for departure times.
4. There is no reserved seating for the bus.

Self Guided Camp Michaux Walking Tour

For over ten years, the Cumberland County Historical Society has supported the development of increased understanding of the history of a site in Cooke Township known as Camp Michaux. The site had been used as a farm associated with the iron industry from 1787-1912, and then as a farm leased by the state from 1913-1919. In 1933 the site became the first Civilian Conservation Corps Camp in Pennsylvania operated on State land and continued to function until 1942. In 1943, the U.S. Army converted the CCC facility for use as a secret interrogation camp for enemy German and Japanese prisoners of war, one of only three such sites in the country. After WWII, the facility was renovated and operated by Camp Michaux, Inc., a joint effort of the United Church of Christ and the United Presbyterian Church, as a youth summer camp.

CCHS has supported increasing accurate knowledge about the history of the site by offering twice annual tours of the site conducted by now retired librarian David L. Smith. The Society also published a book by John P. Bland entitled Secret War at Home: The Pine Grove Furnace POW Interrogation Camp. In 2010, the Society, in partnership with Michaux State Forest, received a grant from the Community Conservation Partnership Program, Environmental Stewardship Fund under the administration of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bureau of Recreation and Conservation to improve accessibility to the site and bring increased recognition regarding its history.

The grant project, entitled Camp Michaux Recognition and Development had three main goals. Under the leadership of David Smith, the project secured an official State Historical Marker for the site which was dedicated in July of 2011. Trails have been opened at the camp and individual sites cleared to make them more visible to the public. A self-guided walking tour book was been written and is now available in a fourth revised edition. The book is keyed to numbered 30 posts that have been erected throughout the former camp. The book is available for downloading below. The third goal of the project is to list the property on the National Register of Historic Places. The nomination process for this phase of the project is still in progress

Click here for a pdf of the Camp Michaux Self-Guided Walking Tour

Bunker Hill Farm
Pine Grove Furnace CCC Camp
Pine Grove Furnace POW Interrogation Camp
Church Camp Michaux

by David L. Smith, Director
Camp Michaux Recognition and Development Project
Cumberland County Historical Society

Statement developed by archeology students from Dickinson College.

As you explore the Dickinson College Camp Michaux website, please keep in mind that archaeology is a careful, precise process. We need your help to protect the history that is still in the ground at Camp Michaux; we can’t learn about it if it’s not there. A few discarded bottles or a broken spearpoint may not seem important but these artifacts tell the stories of past people who can no longer speak for themselves. Recovering this information is a careful process that archaeologists are trained to do. Disturbances such as digging, removing objects, and leaving graffiti are illegal and detrimental to the site.

We are all stewards of this important place; please respect it and help us protect it!